Remarkable Stories About How Most Things Can Be Recycled

bottle house
Most of us recycle newspapers, bottles, cans and cardboard packaging but did you know that most things can be recycled? And some people prove it in the most dramatic way. Building a house entirely out of beer cans seems incredible, but John Milkovisch, a retired upholsterer did just that in the U.S. Whilst Édouard T. Arsenault built a house out of 25,000 recycled bottles in Canada. Victor Moore, built the “junk castle” completely from salvaged materials back in the 70’s for the tiny sum of $US500! Architects in the Netherlands more recently built a modern home from recycled materials discovered in the area. Recycled steel from an old textile mill was used for the framework and the façade was made of wood from cable reels.
Cable reel home

Can you imagine recycling dentures? A not for profit organization has found a way to make money from discarded dentures, reclaiming metals like gold and silver. They donate the proceeds from the sale of the metals to Unicef. And the best story of all – an airport that collects used chewing gum! The airport in England recycles the gum into tyres, toys and other products.

It is remarkable how many materials and items we use that can be recycled and re-used. Kartaway Adelaide are dedicated to diverting waste from landfill and recycle most of the waste they receive. Items they receive and recycle at their Recycling Depot in Campbelltown, Adelaide are:
green waste
electronic waste

The Recycling Depot is accessible in any weather, being undercover, and is open 7 days, so it’s easy to drop off your waste. Or order a bin or skip from Kartaway and know that they will drop off and pick up the bin or skip, then sort and recycle what you throw out.

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Kartaway Skips and Bins and Recycled Building Materials in Adelaide

kartaway_truck_skip lift

Kartaway Adelaide provide bins and skips to builders and home renovators, when they pick up the bins or skips they will do the sorting, this saves builders valuable time. Most building materials can be recycled and Kartaway Adelaide recycle wherever possible.

Recycling Concrete
Concrete can be recycled and is used for gravel and the base material for roadways. Recycling concrete saves on landfill, reduces gravel mining and reduces pollution. 1,360 gallons of water and 900 kg of co2 can be saved when one ton of cement is recycled. Construction costs can also be kept down by using recycled concrete.

The concrete is sent off to specialist facilities to be crushed in crushing machines. Trash, wood, paper and similar materials must be removed first, as only uncontaminated concrete can be put through the machines. The facility removes metals, using magnets. These metals are then melted down for recycling elsewhere. Once crushed other particulates are filtered out resulting in fines and aggregates, which can be used within the building and construction industry.

Recycling Bricks
Recycled bricks can be used in many ways, they will be either cleaned for re-use, crushed into brick chips, or crushed into finer particles. The cleaned bricks are re-used for buildings, wall construction or landscaping. Recycled brick chips become landscape material and the fine brick particles are used in manufacturing road-base, fill sand, track and drainage material and to make new bricks.

Recycling Soil
Soil is inevitably picked up along with the waste when it is loaded, ending up at the Recycling Depots when the waste building materials are dropped off. This soil can also be recycled and is put through several screens to produce a finer product which can then be re-used.

Recycling Plaster .
Plaster board or Gyprock has been recycled very successfully. The board is separated to create the gypsum powder. This can be achieved quite efficiently where high quantities are available and the plaster powder produced is nearly as good as the virgin quality.

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Kartaway Adelaide Supports The Environmental Gains Made Through Recycling

kartaway_truck_semi trailer at transfer station

“Australians are doing the right thing and recycling has become a way of life” commented Vanio Calgaro, General Manager of Australian Packaging Covenant recently.  When you look at the savings on environmental impact that recycling makes, it is highly motivating.

Plastic was once the ‘problem child’ adding large volumes to landfill, but these days plastic can be recycled, with a saving  of 88% of energy in producing plastic products compared to using raw materials. A surprising number of products can be produced from recycled plastic:

plastic nurdles

  • picnic tables and park benches
  • plant pots
  • sign posts
  • speed humps
  • compost bins
  • garden edging
  • clothing
  • carpet fibre
  • paint brushes
  •  automotive parts
  • plastic bottles

Kartaway Adelaide, a leading waste management company, commends the environmental gains made through recycling and supports these efforts by recycling waste collected wherever possible. Their public Recycling Depot at Campbelltown collects all material but putrifiable waste.

Glass is one of the great success stories in recycling, being 100% recyclable and saving 30% energy when used to manufacture more glass products.  It can be recycled over and over again, indefinitely, thousands and millions of times. Refillable glass bottles use half the energy of a throwaway bottle, using only 19,000 BTUs of energy, compared to 38,000 BTUs for throwaway bottles. Recycling just one glass bottle saves enough energy to keep a 100 watt electric light bulb going for four hours!

Save a remarkable 95% of energy recycling aluminium cans into more aluminium cans, cars and aeroplanes. Run your TV for three hours or a 100 watt light bulb for 3.5 hours using the energy you save when you recycle just one aluminium can.

Recycling steel cans for steel product manufacture makes massive gains, like a saving of 74% in energy, a reduction of air pollution by 86%,a 90% savings in virgin materials, which means that water pollution is reduced by 76% and mining waste is reduced by 97%!. Recycled steel cans go into the manufacture of more steel cans, bolts and nuts, structural steel and coat hangers.

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Recycling Plastics And Everything Else Is Easy At Adelaide Recycling Depot

Kartaway Adelaide are leaders in environmental waste management, excelling in recycling. Collecting waste from households, builders, corporations, shopping complexes, restaurants and educational facilities they recycle most of the waste collected, including plastic.  Once plastic was a major problem, the original plastics developed in the 1950s did not break down for hundreds of years and were a big contributor to landfill.  The development of PETE and HDPE plastics in the 80’s and 90’s was a major break-through in the recycling of plastics, as these types of plastics could be re-used in manufacturing processes.  From that time on consumers, builders and manufacturers could send their plastic items to be recycled.

Although requiring more steps than metal, glass and pape, plastics are now successfully recycled. The dyes, fillers and additives must first be removed, the plastics require intense sorting and then they can be chopped into small pieces.  After cleaning these pieces are melted down to be compressed into plastic pellets, known as nurdles.  It is these nurdles that are used in the manufacturing of new plastic products.

The public were educated in the benefits of recycling plastic and have taken to it with gusto.  In 2010-11 a total of 287,360 tonnes of plastic products were diverted from landfill.  Kartaway have assisted in the recycling program, supplying bins and skips, doing the sorting and ensuring most waste is recycled.  They also run a public Recycling Depot in Campbelltown which will accept nearly all waste materials, apart from putrifiable waste, and recycle it.  Committed to the environment, Kartaway make it easy for the public to recycle their old goods and building materials by being open 7 days and offering a clean, affordable and accessible Depot.


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Recycling in Australia and South Australia’s Contribution

The history of recycling in Australia has been a long one, beginning in households in the early days when items, through necessity, were re-used and recycled. The earliest organised recycling programs were the collection of waste paper, began in Melbourne in the 1920s. By the 1940s horse and cart collections of newspapers were commonplace from Australian households and the paper was re-used in packaging.  In the 1920s Henry Ford recycled his Model T Fords and in 1915 BHP Steel began recycling industrial steel scrap. Metals were one of the earliest recycled materials with scrap metal dealers recovering metal and reselling it.

Paul Joseph Whelan had a demolition business in Melbourne during that era and began selling second hand building material from the sites.  His company, Whelan The Wrecker, was the fore-runner to Kartaway, who are now a leading company recycling waste in Australia. With a branch in Adelaide, Kartaway hire skips and bins, develop waste management programs and run a public Recycling Depot at Virginia Road, Newtown, Campbelltown.

In 1977 South Australia introduced container deposit legislation to encourage the return of beverage containers for recycling. This continues to be a highly successful environmental program. Its aim is litter reduction and resource recovery and it is one of the first pieces of ‘product stewardship’ legislation.  Under this legislation beverage suppliers are obliged to ensure they have a system in place to recover and recycle their empty containers.  As a result of this legislation, South Australia leads the nation in the recovery, recycling and reduction of litter of beverage containers, with a return rate of 80.8%. Beverage containers now make up only 2.2% of litter. Nearly 595 million containers were returned to collection depots during 2012-2013, diverting 46,200 tonnes from landfill. This scheme has been so successful that it was awarded the State Heritage Icon.


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Millionaire Made His Money Recycling In China

In the world news recently for his outlandish bid to buy the New York times, Colourful Chinese millionaire Chen Guangbiao built his fortune through his recycling company, Huangpu Renewable Resources Utilization Group. He began his entrepreneurial ways early in life, selling water to a nearby village. After several small business ventures he founded his recycling company following the demolition of a stadium in Nanjing.  As he was not paid for the demolition he looked for a way to make it pay and sold the used iron and concrete to turn a profit.  The iron was sold to iron and steel companies for recycling and the cement blocks were turned back into concrete by mixing with water, cement and sand. Discovering that all construction waste could be transformed into at least seven types of building materials, such as landfill, red brick and building blocks Chen recognised an opportunity.  China produces 2 billion tons of construction waste, a rich market for recycling.

Chen has never forgotten his humble beginnings in a village and is a major Philanthropist, providing relief aid to Japan’s earthquake-tsunami affected areas, flooded areas of Pakistan and earthquake affected Sichuan province in China. Flamboyant and a lover of publicity, Chen has staged publicity stunts like selling “canned air” in Beijing to raise awareness about the environment.

James Paul Whelan started small too on the other side of the world, in Melbourne in 1892. Beginning with a cartage company he also moved into the demolition business, selling second hand materials from the sites. His company, Whelan The Wrecker, became a famous icon in Melbourne. Over the years the company grew, acquiring other businesses including Mini Skips.  Now a national company and still run by the Whelan family, Kartaway runs public recycling depots and hires skips and bins. The Adelaide branch has a recycling depot in Virginia Rd, Newtown, Campbelltown. Clean, affordable and easily accessible the Depot can recycle most waste and is conveniently open 7 days.

Kartaway Adelaide also services the building trade, restaurants, body corporates, educational facilities and shopping malls with customised waste management plans.

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New Sales Representative for Kartaway Adelaide

Kartaway are pleased to welcome a new Sales Representative  for the Adelaide branch, Vince Newhill.  Bringing sixteen years of experience to the firm, Vince has worked with other major waste management companies Cleanaway and Seita.  He is focussed on gaining new commercial business for Kartaway Adelaide and with his knowledge and experience in the industry Kartaway look forward to seeing further growth in this area.

A family man, Vince has a wife and three children and has been a resident of Adelaide for many years.  He is looking forward to developing a strong presence in waste management services at all levels in South Australia for Kartaway.  The Adelaide branch is currently working on bringing all infrastructure and equipment up to date to cope with the expected increase in demand.

They remind all their customers that now is an important time to clean up, prior to the Christmas festive season and holiday break when most households have an influx of visitors.  Their Recycling Depot at Virginia Rd, Newtown, Campbelltown is clean, accessible and affordable.  Fill up your boot or trailer and bring your rubbish to the Depot, where most of it can be recycled.  The friendly staff are there to help with any questions or directions.  Alternatively order a skip or bin now and get rid of all sorts of waste, like automotive parts, concrete, building materials, batteries, glass, plastics and paper.  Call 1300 362 362 to order your skip or bin.

The company and Recycling Depot will be closed for Christmas Day and New Year’s Day.  Kartaway Adelaide wishes all their customers a very happy festive season and look forward to a great year in 2014.

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